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Malibu Sunburst Baby Blanket - Free Crochet Tutorial - Part 1

I’m so excited to be offering my first free crochet blanket tutorial here on my blog! The project Malibu Sunburst 2is called Malibu Sunburst Baby Blanket and the tutorial is written in US crochet terms.  The tutorial will be posted in four parts over the next few weeks - gathering supplies, the squares, the blocks, and the border.  This project is suitable for an advanced, (or adventurous), beginner. The tutorial is written for a 36” x 36” baby blanket, but if you want a larger blanket this can easily be adjusted in size – I’ve put detailed yarn amounts, (per square/per block/for border), at the end of this post so that with a little simple math you should be able to calculate for any adjustments you might want to make. The basis of the blanket pattern is the Sunburst Granny Square. There are many variations of this granny square floating around, but as far as I can tell they are all descendants of the original Sunburst Granny Square by Priscilla Hewitt , so hats off to Priscilla for sharing this wonderful pattern that has been the starting point of many a lovely project over the last 20 years or so. If you like to use Pinterest, you may want to do a search for “sunburst granny square” to get some colour inspiration for your Malibu Sunburst blanket. Today I’m going to give you the information you need to gather your supplies for the Malibu Sunburst Baby Blanket, whether that’s from your current stash, a trip to the yarn shop, or your favourite web site. Before I do that, though, I'd like to point out that by subscribing to the blog, (using the "Become a Subscriber" box in the right column of the blog), all posts will be delivered straight to your inbox.  You can also find Two Stix Studios on Facebook, Instagram, and Pinterest if you'd like to follow along or post photos of your progress using one of those mediums, (please use #malibusunburst and tag @twostixstudios on Instagram).  Finally, please do leave any questions or comments for me here on the blog -- I'll get back to you as soon as possible if you have questions! Details The finished Blanket is 36” x 36” and consists of 36 four-inch Sunburst Squares which are then pieced into nine four-piece ten-inch blocks. The nine blocks are configured in three rows of three blocks each. If you want a larger blanket you could simply make more blocks or you could do more edging rows either on the blocks themselves or in the final border after the blocks are put together. You could also make your blanket more rectangular by configuring it as a 3x4 or 5x6, etc. This pattern is very easy to adjust in a way that suits your needs, but just remember that yarn requirements will vary once you start changing the configuration. For my Malibu Sunburst Blanket I used Scheepjes Catona, which is a 4 ply mercerized 100% cotton. Unlike some mercerized cotton it has just a small amount of sheen and I would consider it very close to a matte finish. It is available in about 70 colours from pastels to brights and everything in between. The colours I have used are somewhere in the middle, I think. Bright enough to be cheery, but muted enough to have a somewhat vintage feel. You can, of course, use your favourite yarn and colours. I’ve used only four colours for my blanket, but it would look great in more colours, (can you say stashbuster?), or even as few as two or three. Again, this blanket can be easily adapted to most weights and fibres, but changing either or both will affect yarn requirements, the size of the finished blanket, and possibly the look of the finished blanket. Materials Yarn (to make blanket as shown): Colour A (Topaz) - 178 grams Colour B (Tropic) -182 grams Colour C (Light Coral) – 149 grams Colour D (Old Lace) 108 grams Total Yarn – 617 grams If you are adjusting the size, there are more detailed yarn measurements at the end of this post that may be useful in determining the amount of yarn you will need. Hook: 3.5mm hook, or size appropriate for your yarn Tapestry Needle (for weaving in ends This concludes Part 1 of the Malibu Sunburst Baby Blanket Tutorial. Part 2 – Making the Sunburst Squares will be posted on Wednesday, March 23, 2016. Yarn breakdown for those adjusting size of blanket: Colour A = Topaz Total Amount for Blanket = 178 grams Per Sunburst Granny Square = 2 grams (2 grams x 36 squares = 72 grams for granny squares) For Block Edging = 9 grams for each block (9 grams x 9 blocks = 81 grams total for blocks) For Border = 25 grams Colour B – Tropic Total Amount for Blanket = 182 grams Per Sunburst Granny Square = 2 grams (2 grams x 18 squares = 36 grams for granny squares) For Block Edging = 9 grams for Block A (9 grams x 4 blocks = 36 grams total for Block A); 12 grams for Block B (12 grams x 5 blocks = 60 grams total for Block B); 96 grams total for Blocks A & B For Border = 50 grams Colour C – Light Coral Total Amount for Blanket = 149 grams Per Sunburst Granny Square = 2 grams (2 grams x 18 squares = 36 grams for granny squares) For Block Edging =12 grams for Block A (12 grams x 4 blocks = 48 grams total for Block A); 9 grams for Block B (9 grams x 5 blocks = 45 grams total for Block B); 93 grams total for Blocks A & B For Border = 20 grams Colour D = Old Lace Total Amount for Blanket = 108 grams Per Sunburst Granny Square = 3 grams (3 grams x 36 squares = 108 grams for granny squares)


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